Berlayer Creek Trail

The Berlayer Creek trail is a segment of the Labrador Nature & Coastal Walk which was officially opened on 2nd January 2012 and I had been meaning to check it out but unfortunately didn’t get a chance to until today.

It’s very accessible as the entrance to the trail is just beside the Labrador MRT station. If you drive, there is a small carpark located next to the MRT exit (coupon parking, free parking only on Sundays). However, if you opt for free parking, you can park at Labrador Nature Reserve’s Car Park ‘C’ and start from the other end of the trail.

There is a huge sign which is visible from the main road and marks the start of the trail at the Labrador MRT station. The Berlayer Creek trail is quite an easy walk and is wheelchair accessible.

  

It was a Saturday afternoon and only one jogger and an amorous teenage couple were out and about at this end of the trail. Although it was my first time here, I wasn’t expecting to see much wildlife as it was still high tide when I arrived.

Several terrapins could be seen swimming around the mangroves.

In the span of about 1.5 hours that I was there, the tide gradually went out as you can see from the following two pictures. The one on the left was taken when I arrived and the one on the right was taken when I left.

 

Mangrove roots are exposed at low tide and you can get a better look at them.

 

It was a lazy afternoon and this little critter was taking a snooze…

See if you can spot him in the next photo!


Now for the rest of the trail…

I couldn’t help noticing the big red ants that were scurrying along the wooden handrails.

They even managed to get themselves safely across the gaps between the handrails!!


There were also quite a number of butterflies which I spotted along the way but some were too quick and I didn’t manage to photograph them all.

Short-Banded Sailor (Phaedyma columella singa)

If you compare the following two pictures, you can see that this butterfly had unrolled its proboscis.

 

Common Palmfly (Elymnias hypermnestra agina)


On one side of the trail is the creek and the other side a field of long grass. There were several bird species hiding in the long grass like the Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) but this one caught my attention.

I later learned that it’s a Chinese Pond Heron (Ardeola bacchus)! They are currently in winter plumage.


Minutes later, several Yellow-vented Bulbuls (Pycnonotus goiavier) were seen hiding amongst the tree branches. They were rather shy and flew away at the slightest noise or movement.


There are two rest points along this trail and this was the first one.

We saw a water monitor (varanus salvator) struggling with something in its mouth. Using my camera’s zoom, I discovered that the monitor lizard was trying to swallow a large fish which was bigger than its mouth!! It was struggling and turning its head from side-to-side to try to swallow its prey.

 

I was hoping to spot a kingfisher as my hubby saw one with shiny feathers fly past earlier on. However, a group of makciks then came by and their animated chatter plus boisterous laughter practically ruined any chances of me spotting any birds!! Even the monitor lizard at the opposite bank started retreating behind the tree branches. Some people were obviously here NOT to observe nature!! (in case you’re wondering….yes, I was annoyed!)

Walked to the second rest point and a group of tertiary students were there playing some games. I didn’t spot anything else there and made my way back to the car park as my parking was up.

If you are into plant life, here are some of the flora which can be found along the trail.


  
  

There was a lovely field of yellow flowers.

 

Is it just me or do you also see a face in the trunk of the tree? :p

It was quite a fruitful nature walk and I will definitely be back (hopefully more birds can be spotted on my next visit)!

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